The Haiti Reader

9781478005162: Hardback
Release Date: 14th February 2020

9781478006770: Paperback
Release Date: 14th February 2020

63 illustrations, incl. 17 in color

Dimensions: 156 x 235

Number of Pages: 568

Series The Latin America Readers

Duke University Press Books

The Haiti Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Spanning the centuries between pre-contact indigenous Haiti to the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake, the selections in The Haiti Reader introduce readers to Haiti's dynamic history and culture from the viewpoint of Haitians from all walks of life.
Hardback / £107.00
This book can only be pre-ordered within 2 months of the publication date.
Paperback / £24.99
This book can only be pre-ordered within 2 months of the publication date.

While Haiti established the second independent nation in the Western Hemisphere and was the first black country to gain independence from European colonizers, its history is not well known in the Anglophone world. The Haiti Reader introduces readers to Haiti's dynamic history and culture from the viewpoint of Haitians from all walks of life. Its dozens of selections—most of which appear here in English for the first time—are representative of Haiti's scholarly, literary, religious, visual, musical, and political cultures, and range from poems, novels, and political tracts to essays, legislation, songs, and folk tales. Spanning the centuries between precontact indigenous Haiti and the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake, the Reader covers widely known episodes in Haiti's history, such as the U.S. military occupation and the Duvalier dictatorship, as well as overlooked periods such as the decades immediately following Haiti's “second independence” in 1934. Whether examining issues of political upheaval, the environment, or modernization, The Haiti Reader provides an unparalleled look at Haiti's history, culture, and politics.

Acknowledgments  xiii
Introduction  1
I. Foundations  7
II. The Second Generation  67
III. The Birth of Modern-Day Haiti
IV. Occupied Haiti (1915–1934)  177
V. Second Independence  251
VI. The Duvalier Years  307
VII. Overthrow and the Aftermath of Duvalier  389
VIII. Haiti in the New Millennium  449
Suggestions for Further Reading and Viewing  513
Acknowledgment of Copyrights and Sources  519
Index

Laurent Dubois is Professor of Romance Studies and History at Duke University. 

Kaiama L. Glover is Professor of French and Africana Studies at Barnard College. 

Nadève Ménard is Professor of Literature at the École Normale Supérieure, Université d’État d’Haïti. 

Millery Polyné is Associate Professor of History at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University. 

Chantalle F. Verna is Associate Professor of History and International Relations at Florida International University.

“Bravo to this editorial collective! With its span from early history to the present, this reader is set to demolish the distorted myths from reality in ways that will undoubtedly disrupt the incessant narratives of exceptionalism plaguing the first Black Republic. This is a revelatory and textured collection of Haitian modernity that brings more of Haitian studies out of exile into the world, and which will become referential for years to come, both in and out of the classroom.”

Gina Athena Ulysse, author of
Because When God Is Too Busy: Haiti, Me, and the World

The Haiti Reader is a remarkable resource for all those who want to learn more about Haiti and its history, politics, literature and culture. Filled with primary sources, some translated here for the first time, this book is a vital and urgently needed guide to an often maligned and misunderstood yet magnificent country.”

Edwidge Danticat, author of
Brother, I'm Dying