Mettray

9781501740183: Hardback
Release Date: 15th November 2019

10 b&w halftones

Dimensions: 152 x 229

Number of Pages: 296

Cornell University Press

Mettray

A History of France's Most Venerated Carceral Institution

The Mettray Penal Colony was a private reformatory without walls, established in France in 1840 for the rehabilitation of young male delinquents. Foucault linked its opening to the most significant change in the modern status of prisons and now, at last, Stephen Toth takes us behind the gates to show how the institution legitimized France's...
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The Mettray Penal Colony was a private reformatory without walls, established in France in 1840 for the rehabilitation of young male delinquents. Foucault linked its opening to the most significant change in the modern status of prisons and now, at last, Stephen Toth takes us behind the gates to show how the institution legitimized France's repression of criminal youth and added a unique layer to the nation's carceral system.

Drawing on insights from sociology, criminology, critical theory, and social history, Stephen Toth dissects Mettray's social anatomy, exploring inmates' experiences. More than 17,000 young men passed through the reformatory before its closure, and Toth situates their struggles within changing conceptions of childhood and adolescence in modern France. Mettray demonstrates that the colony was an ill-conceived project marked by internal contradictions. Its social order was one of subjection and subversion, as officials struggled for order and inmates struggled for autonomy.

Toth's formidable archival work exposes the nature of the relationships between, and among, prisoners and administrators. He explores the daily grind of existence: living conditions, discipline, labor, sex, and violence. Thus, he gives voice to the incarcerated, not simply to the incarcerators, whose ideas and agendas tend to dominate the historical record. Mettray is, above all else, a deeply personal illumination of life inside France's most venerated carceral institution.

Stephen A. Toth is Associate Professor of Modern European History at Arizona State University. The primary focus of his research examines the history of incarceration, most particularly the evolution of the prison in theory and practice, in modern France and the Francophone world. He is the author of Beyond Papillon and numerous scholarly articles. He has been the recipient of research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Philosophical Society.

"Mettray is among the leading books on the subject of youth, penal institutions, and gender. Exploiting the rich, recently released trove of documentation chronicling the history of the institution, Toth reveals how the utopian expectations of its planners foundered in myriad ways."

Robert Nye, Oregon State University, editor of Sexuality

"Toth has had access to an extraordinary archive—the actual daily records of life in Mettray, the original colony for juvenile delinquents in France. As such, his book is the first to use the voices of the inmates themselves, as well as the detailed records of the most important penal institution of its time. This is ground-breaking analysis."

Barbara Arneil, University of British Columbia, author of Domestic Colonies

"While Foucault famously called attention to carceral institutions and their effort to create 'docile bodies,' Toth looks at how those efforts actually worked. He shows how discipline both functioned and failed to function, and how prisoners resisted. Based on exemplary archival research, Mettray evokes the experience of inmates with real depth."

Clifford Rosenberg, City College of New York, author of Policing Paris