God Talk

9781439908655: Hardback
Release Date: 20th December 2013

9781439908662: Paperback
Release Date: 20th December 2013

Dimensions: 152 x 229

Number of Pages: 276

Series Social Logic of Politics

Temple University Press

God Talk

Experimenting With the Religious Causes of Public Opinion

Written by
Paul Djupe
and
Brian Calfano
Religion’s influence on public opinion, politics, and candidates has been widely discussed in political science for a generation. God Talk isthe first volume that uses experimental methodology to establish whether and how that influence works. Paul Djupe and Brian Calfano provide an unprecedented look at how religious cues, values, and identity-driven appeals impact candidate selection, trust, interest group support, and U.S. public opinion about tolerance, the environment, foreign policy, and related issues. By situating their disparate, randomly assigned interventions within the broader framework of elite-based influence, the authors apply their new methodology to three questions: How do clergy affect congregation members? How are religious elites and groups and their public arguments evaluated? With what effect do political elites use religion? The results of their research provide a compelling framework for understanding the links between religion and politics.In the series The Social Logic of Politics, edited by Scott McClurg
Hardback / £72.00
Paperback / £24.99

Religion’s influence on public opinion, politics, and candidates has been widely discussed in political science for a generation. God Talk isthe first volume that uses experimental methodology to establish whether and how that influence works. Paul Djupe and Brian Calfano provide an unprecedented look at how religious cues, values, and identity-driven appeals impact candidate selection, trust, interest group support, and U.S. public opinion about tolerance, the environment, foreign policy, and related issues. By situating their disparate, randomly assigned interventions within the broader framework of elite-based influence, the authors apply their new methodology to three questions: How do clergy affect congregation members? How are religious elites and groups and their public arguments evaluated? With what effect do political elites use religion? The results of their research provide a compelling framework for understanding the links between religion and politics.In the series The Social Logic of Politics, edited by Scott McClurg

Acknowledgments
 
Introduction: Obama Is a Muslim? What Religion and Politics Research Has to Say
 
1 Getting to the Heart of Things: The State of the Literature and the Promise of Experiments in Religion and Politics Research
 
PART I With What Effect Do Political Elites Use Religion?
2 God Talk: Religious Cues and Electoral Support
3 Why People Will Not Vote for Atheist Candidates, coauthored with Chelsea Back
 
PART II How Are Religious Elites and Groups and Their Public Arguments Evaluated?
4 Evangelizing the Environment: Decision Process Effects in Political Persuasion, coauthored with Gregory W. Gwiasda
5 Justification Not by Faith Alone: Clergy Generating Trust and Certainty by Revealing Thought
6 Between a Bloc and a Hard Place: Voters’ Perceptions of Group Threat Credibility in Elections
7 Fair and Balanced: Conditional Elite Effects on Threat Perceptions of Homosexuals among Evangelical Protestants, coauthored with Samantha Webb
 
PART III How Can Congregation-Based Elites Affect Members?
8 Divine Intervention? The Influence of Religious Values Communication on U.S. Foreign Intervention Policy
9 The Civil Brake: Values as Contextual Influences on Elite Framing Effects
 
Conclusion: An Emerging Approach to the Study of Religious Influence
 
Appendix
References
Index

Paul A. Djupe is Associate Professor of Political Science at Denison University. He is the coauthor (with Christopher Gilbert) of The Political Influence of Churches and (with Laura Olson), Religious Interests in Community Conflict, and co-editor of the journal Politics & Religion.
 
Brian R.Calfano is Associate Professor of Political Science at Missouri State University. His research interests include religion and politics, media, and social identity. He has published articles in Political Research Quarterly, Political Behavior, Politics and Religion, Social Science Quarterly, and related outlets.  

"[I]t is Djupe and Calfano’s contention that the subfield of religion and politics has not adequately addressed the exposure-adoption puzzle in religious settings…. There is much to be said for their argument and approach. They clearly delineate key theoretical strains in the religion and politics subfield, draw from cutting-edge work in political science more generally, and deploy a fresh and exciting research design. Their work presents many opportunities for developing new lines of inquiry."--Review of Religious Research