Greatness Engendered

9780801426285: Hardback
Release Date: 20th February 1992

9781501727771: Paperback
Release Date: 15th August 2018

Dimensions: 152 x 229

Number of Pages: 336

Series Reading Women Writing

Cornell University Press

Greatness Engendered

George Eliot and Virginia Woolf

In this forceful and compelling book, Alison Booth traces through the novels, essays, and other writings of George Eliot and Virginia Woolf radically conflicting attitudes on the part of each toward the possibility of feminine...
Hardback / £43.00
Paperback / £9.99

The egotism that fuels the desire for greatness has been associated exclusively with men, according to one feminist view; yet many women cannot suppress the need to strive for greatness. In this forceful and compelling book, Alison Booth traces through the novels, essays, and other writings of George Eliot and Virginia Woolf radically conflicting attitudes on the part of each toward the possibility of feminine greatness. Examining the achievements of Eliot and Woolf in their social contexts, she provides a challenging model of feminist historical criticism.

Alison Booth is Professor of English at the University of Virginia and Director of the Scholars’ Lab at the University of Virginia Library. She is the author of How to Make It as a Woman: Collective Biographical History from Victoria to the Present, winner of the Barbara Penny Kanner Award.

"Booth successfully demonstrates how Eliot and Woolf challenged gender prescriptions by the very act of writing history as well as by the kind of history they wrote. She is careful to point out that Eliot and Woolf were not the first to shift the focus of history to common life, but she persuasively argues that they pushed it further by explicitly addressing what patriarchal discourses had silenced or obscured: the issue of gender and historical interpretation."

Suzanne Graver
Modern Philology

"Greatness Engendered takes its place appropriately in Cornell’s Reading Women Writing series. It provides a useful examination of how two major authors both read and wrote the problem of greatness."

Caroline Webb
South Atlantic Review