National Dreams

9780812219067: Paperback
Release Date: 29th November 2004

26 illus.

Dimensions: 152 x 229

Number of Pages: 208

University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.

National Dreams

The Remaking of Fairy Tales in Nineteenth-Century England

"This engaging text makes explicit the ways in which fairy tales provide 'a space in which to encounter and then reflect upon national identities and differences.' . . . Highly recommended."—Choice

Paperback / £23.99

Fairy tales and folktales have long been mainstays of children's literature, celebrated as imaginatively liberating, psychologically therapeutic, and mirrors of foreign culture. Focusing on the fairy tale in nineteenth-century England, where many collections found their largest readership, National Dreams examines influential but critically neglected early experiments in the presentation of international tale traditions to English readers. Jennifer Schacker looks at such wondrous story collections as Grimms' fairy tales and The Arabian Nights in order to trace the larger stories of cross-cultural encounter in which these books were originally embedded. Examining aspects of publishing history alongside her critical readings of tale collections' introductions, annotations, story texts, and illustrations, Schacker's National Dreams reveals the surprising ways fairy tales shaped and were shaped by their readers.

Schacker shows how the folklore of foreign lands became popular reading material for a broad English audience, historicizing assumed connections between traditional narrative and children's reading. The tales imported and presented by such British writers as Edgar Taylor, T. Crofton Croker, Edward Lane, and George Webbe Dasent were intended to stimulate readers' imaginations in more ways than one. Fairy-tale collections provided flights of fancy but also opportunities for reflection on the modern self, on the transformation of popular culture, and on the nature of "Englishness." Schacker demonstrates that such critical reflections were not incidental to the popularity of foreign tales but central to their magical hold on the English imagination.

Offering a theoretically sophisticated perspective on the origins of current assumptions about the significance of fairy tales, National Dreams provides a rare look at the nature and emergence of one of the most powerful and enduring genres in English literature.

1. Introduction

2. The Household Tales in the Household Library: Edgar Taylor's "German Popular Stories"
3. Everything Is in the Telling: T. Crofton Croker's "Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland"
4. Otherness and Otherworldliness: Edward W. Lane's "Arabian Nights"
5. The Dreams of the Younger Brother: George Webbe Dasent's "Popular Tales from the Norse"

6. Conclusion: Dreams

Notes
Bibliography
Index
Acknowledgments

Jennifer Schacker teaches in the School of Literatures and Performance Studies in English at the University of Guelph.

"Schacker . . . draws attention to the way actual editions were produced, marketed, and consumed. Those physical objects, the books themselves, contain the best evidence of their own histories, and how literature took part in cultural life."—Virginia Quarterly Review

"This engaging text makes explicit the ways in which fairy tales provide 'a space in which to encounter and then reflect upon national identities and differences.' . . . Highly recommended."—Choice