Combined Academic Publishers

Diplomatic Departures

9780774808651: Paperback
Release Date: 1st May 2002

24 b&w photographs, illustrations, tables

Dimensions: 152 x 229

Number of Pages: 344

Series Canada and International Relations

UBC Press

Diplomatic Departures

The Conservative Era in Canadian Foreign Policy, 1984 - 93

The first major scholarly examination of the foreign policy of the Mulroney Conservative era, this collection analyzes free trade with the U.S., a continentalized energy policy, the transformation of peacekeeping into peacemaking, and other departures from traditional Canadian statecraft.
Paperback / £29.99

During the nine years that the Conservatives under Brian Mulroney held power in Ottawa, Canadian foreign policy underwent a series of important departures from established policy. Some of these changes mirrored the major transformations in global politics that occurred during this period as the Berlin Wall was breached, the Cold War came to an end, and a globalized economy emerged. But some of the changes were the results of initiatives taken by the Conservative government.

The first major scholarly examination of the foreign policy of this period, this collection explores and analyzes the many departures from traditional Canadian statecraft that took place during the Mulroney Conservative era: free trade with the U.S., a continentalized energy policy, initiatives over the environment and the Arctic, the withdrawal of Canadian forces from Europe, and the transformation of peacekeeping into peacemaking.

Foreword / Barbara J. McDougall

Acronyms

Part 1: Introduction

1 The Conservative Era in Canadian Foreign Policy, 1984-93 / Nelson Michaud and Kim Richard Nossal

2 Architects or Engineers? The Conservatives and Foreign Policy / Denis Stairs

Part 2: Policy Issues

3 Leaving the Past Behind: The Free Trade Initiative / Brian Tomlin

4 Continental Drift: Energy Policy and Canadian–American Relations / Tammy L. Nemeth

5 Shades of Grey in Canada’s Greening during the Mulroney Era / Heather A. Smith

6 A Northern Foreign Policy: The Politics of Ad Hocery / Rob Huebert

7 Big Eyes and Empty Pockets: The Two Phases of Conservative Defence Policy / Norrin M. Ripsman

8 The Conservative Approach to International Peacekeeping / Manon Tessier and Michel Fortmann

9 Mulroney’s International “Beau Risque”: The Golden Age of Québec's Foreign Policy / Luc Bernier

10 Explaining the Decision to Join the OAS: An Interpretation / Gordon Mace

11 Good Global Governance or Political Opportunism? Mulroney and UN Social Conferences / Andrew F. Cooper

12 How Exceptional? Assessing the Anti-Apartheid “Crusade” / David M. Black

13 Liberal Internationalism for Conservatives: The Good Governance Initiative / Paul Gecelovsky and Tom Keating

Part 3: The Policy-Making Process

14 The Conservatives and Foreign Policy-Making: A Foreign Service View / J.H. Taylor

15 Adding Women but Forgetting to Stir: Gender and Foreign Policy in the Mulroney Era / Claire Turenne Sjolander

16 Ethnic Groups and Conservative Foreign Policy / Roy Norton

17 Bureaucratic Politics and the Making of the 1987 Defence White Paper / Nelson Michaud

18 Opening Up the Policy Process: How Important Is Party? / Kim Richard Nossal

19 Diplomatic Departures? Assessing the Conservative Era in Foreign Policy / Nelson Michaud and Kim Richard Nossal

Appendices

A Chronology of Events, 1984-93

B Photo Gallery

C Foreign Policy Appointments, 1984-93

Bibliographical Essay

Contributors

Index

Nelson Michaud teaches at the Ecole nationale d'administration publique (Université du Quebec) and is Research Fellow at the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie University. Kim Richard Nossal is the Department Head of Political Studies at Queen's University.

Contributors: Barbara McDougall, Denis Stairs, Brian Tomlin, Tammy L. Nemeth, Heather Smith, Rob Huebert, Norrin Ripsman, Manon Tessier, Michel Fortmann, Luc Bernier, Gordon Mace, Andrew F. Cooper, David M. Black, Paul Gecelovsky, Tom Keating, J.H. Taylor, Claire Turenne Sjolander, and Roy Norton.